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  • Unveiling MTK Cookbook 2.0 – Redefining Healthy Eating

    Author – Ramya Rajaram Contributor – Harmanpreet Kaur Editing – Veronica Funk, Matheus Abrantes, Sumantra Ray Join us on the next step in our culinary journey! We are delighted to share the much-anticipated release of the MTK Cookbook 2.0, now available on Amazon. The MTK Cookbook features over 50 healthy recipes meticulously curated from the Bhavishya Shakti Kitchen, an initiative of NNEdPro, Global Institute for Food, Nutrition, and Health, under the flagship project of the Mobile Teaching Kitchens Initiative. This latest edition represents a significant milestone in our ongoing commitment to fostering healthier eating habits and empowering communities through the art of cooking. At the heart of the MTK Cookbook lies a labour of love from the dedicated members of the MTK team, with advice and support from experts in the field. With meticulous attention to detail and a passion for nutrition, we have curated a diverse collection of recipes designed to dazzle your taste buds while nourishing your body. Developed in collaboration with nutritionists, dietitians, educational supervisors and our champions, each recipe is a testament to our unwavering dedication to promoting wellness through culinary excellence. Drawing inspiration from the culinary wonders of the MTK base kitchen, our cookbook offers a fusion of taste and nutrition like never before. From hearty main courses to indulgent desserts, every dish has been carefully crafted to strike the perfect balance between flavour and health. With the MTK Cookbook 2.0 as your guide, discover how simple changes in your diet can lead to profound improvements in your overall well-being. The debut edition of the cookbook was carefully curated to cater to the culinary preferences of this demographic, offering innovative twists on familiar dishes while prioritising nutritional value. Crafted under the guidance of renowned dietitians and collaborative efforts, these recipes received acclaim from the working class and the corporate sector. Our MTK mobile unit and base kitchen in Kolkata, India, served as a conduit for delivering these delectable and nutritious meals directly to corporate offices, where they were enthusiastically embraced by professionals seeking convenient yet health-conscious dining options. However, with the onset of the global pandemic, our mobile operations faced unprecedented challenges, compelling us to adapt and innovate in response to the evolving needs of our community. In the wake of COVID-19, the demand for nutritious and accessible meals surged, prompting the evolution of Cookbook 2.0. Drawing upon invaluable feedback from our loyal customers during these tumultuous times, we embarked on a journey to reimagine our menu templates, ensuring they resonated with an even broader audience. The result is a reinvigorated collection of recipes seamlessly blending flavour and nutrition, catering to diverse tastes and dietary preferences. What sets these recipes apart is their nutritional completeness. Each dish is meticulously crafted to incorporate essential vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals from plant-based sources, ensuring a balanced and wholesome meal. MTK templates are also rich in protein, giving you building blocks to sustain your muscles and allow growth in children. They contain plenty of fibre, which prevents bowel disease and keeps your gut healthy, as well as "friendly" bacteria. Some MTK template menus are ovo-lacto-vegetarian and include eggs. However, each of these recipes can be adapted for lacto-vegetarians and contains eggs, which are optional for lacto-vegetarians, vegans and those following a 'satvic' vegetarian diet. Each template can be modified as per an individual's requirements by removing and substituting eggs with either dairy (e.g. paneer) or plant-based (e.g. tofu) protein sources, and all dishes that contain onions and garlic can be made using ginger and/or asafetida as a substitute. Whether you're a non-vegetarian, vegetarian, or vegan, our recipes offer adaptability, with options to substitute ingredients according to individual preferences and dietary restrictions. A full meal prepared using one of the MTK Cookbook Menu Templates provides most of the day's micronutrient requirements while being rich in protein, containing higher quality, and releasing slower carbs. The essence of the MTK Cookbook extends beyond a mere compilation of recipes; it embodies the ethos of the SEE One, DO One, and TEACH One training philosophy. Rooted in the principle of experiential learning, our cookbook serves as a dynamic platform for knowledge exchange within our community. By sharing culinary techniques, nutritional wisdom, and insights into the health benefits of wholesome eating, we empower individuals to reclaim control over their well-being, one meal at a time. As each recipe unfolds, it becomes a vehicle for nourishing the body and enriching the mind, fostering a culture of culinary empowerment and holistic health consciousness. As we unveil the MTK Cookbook 2.0, we invite you to embark on a journey of flavour and nourishment. Let these recipes satisfy your cravings and inspire you to embrace a healthier lifestyle. Together, let's savour the joy of good food and the gift of good health. Happy cooking! Purchase the book now: Amazon UK Amazon India Amazon US

  • Malnutrition Policy to Achieve Universal Health Coverage in ASEAN Member States: A Call to Action

    Authors: Helena Trigueiro, Jørgen Torgerstuen Johnsen, Sucheta Mitra, Halima Jama, Mei Yen Chan and Sumantra Ray Reviewer and Editor: Ramya Rajaram Copyeditor: Veronica Funk Key Acknowledgements: Shailaja Fennel, Siti Rohaiza Binti Ahmad and Anne Cunningham; Support from the University of Cambridge, ASEAN Secretariat and Universiti Brunei Darussalam Special Acknowledgement for Funding in Part: Mary Lim (NNEdPro Southeast Asia) Introduction The pervasive issue of malnutrition remains a global challenge, Impacting nations worldwide and posing a significant obstacle to the attainment of the 2025 global nutrition targets, despite notable progress captured by certain indicators. The establishment of the ASEAN Community has facilitated the implementation of comprehensive health initiatives by the ASEAN Health Sector, specifically aimed at ensuring food and nutrition security on both national and regional scales. Given the widespread implications of malnutrition and diet-related non-communicable diseases stemming from unhealthy dietary practices, the promotion of a healthy diet coupled with the effective implementation of nutrition-sensitive interventions emerges as instrumental in advancing towards these objectives. Within the realm of international and national pursuits aligned with the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Universal Health Coverage stands as a paramount focus for the World Health Organization. In this blog post, we delve into the evolving landscape of nutrition-related policies among Member States of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), underscoring the urgency for concerted action and offering recommendations to combat malnutrition within the broader framework of achieving universal health coverage. Malnutrition in the ASEAN Region Malnutrition, encompassing both undernutrition and overnutrition, poses a substantial human capital and economic development challenge across most ASEAN Member States. Undernutrition, prevalent in lower-income countries, heightens the risks of infant morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditures. It undermines educational investments, reduces income-earning potential, and impacts labour force productivity, potentially perpetuating across generations. Some ASEAN states experience annual GDP losses ranging from 2.4% to 4.4% due to undernutrition. Concurrently, overnutrition, evidenced by rising obesity rates, compounds these challenges. Over the past 35 years, obesity prevalence in ASEAN has surged over sevenfold, with Cambodia, Indonesia, and Lao PDR experiencing over tenfold increases. Childhood overweight, exceeding 25% prevalence in Brunei, Malaysia, and Thailand, incurs direct costs, such as 16% in Brunei, and is expected to escalate indirect costs through labour productivity loss. The coexistence of undernutrition and overnutrition within households and individuals, termed the double burden, varies across ASEAN countries. Poverty is a fundamental cause of undernutrition, driven by poor infant feeding practices, insufficient access to nutritious foods, and limited healthcare. Conversely, overnutrition is primarily linked to changing lifestyles and urbanisation, with urban areas fostering environments conducive to the consumption of processed and unhealthy foods. Addressing malnutrition demands region-specific policy responses, acknowledging the diverse determinants involved, such as maternal and childcaring practices, food security, and women's social status. This emphasizes the critical need for targeted interventions to address both undernutrition and overnutrition within the ASEAN region. Harnessing Global Initiatives – Universal Health Coverage (UHC) and nutrition in tackling malnutrition in ASEAN Member States   The World Health Organization (WHO) defines UHC as ensuring that all individuals and communities receive necessary health services without facing financial hardship. This approach facilitates universal access to services addressing major health concerns. This approach requires not only accessibility but also a commitment to delivering high-quality services to enhance overall health. Tackling malnutrition in its various forms demands breaking down silos and addressing nutritional needs throughout the entire life-course, especially during key stages of life like pregnancy, infancy, and early childhood. Adopting a life-course approach necessitates a deeper understanding of nutritionally sensitive life stages while concurrently addressing multiple forms of malnutrition. The complexity of deconstructing health systems is evident, particularly when dealing with a cross-cutting and multi-sectoral issue like nutrition, where actions naturally overlap. Current UHC status data for ASEAN member states reveal lagging overall progress. While some data points are outdated, assessing country contexts and gaps is crucial before implementing cost-effective solutions outlined in the 2020 Global Nutrition Report and WHO's Mobilising Ambitious and Impactful Commitments for Mainstreaming Nutrition in Health Systems – Nutrition in Universal Health Coverage brief. Despite having tools and knowledge, there's a shortfall in implementation expertise. To tailor strategies to each country and region's contexts, meticulous planning and assessment of ideal nutrition and health interventions are necessary to maximise health outcomes. Recognising the difficulties posed by diversity and political differences among ASEAN member states, effective healthcare systems can only be established through collective efforts. We believe that by transcending national boundaries and fostering a united approach, ASEAN member states can overcome existing fragmentation, addressing health policies and programs through enhanced and sustained regional mechanisms and a broader model of cooperation within this significant multilateral group. Recommendations Challenges have impeded progress in achieving Universal Health Coverage (UHC) in certain Member States due to a lack of clear nutrition action and the implementation of essential nutrition measures. In response, we advocate for: Regional cooperation structure between ASEAN and WHO regional offices along with high level political commitment: WHO regional office in the South-East Asia region has been instrumental in designing regional flagship programs achieving key SDGs for Health. Some of the areas WHO is working on includeaccelerating maternal and child health, achieving progress towards universal health coverage, enhancing capacity development in managing other health emergencies, etc. Inclusive framework for cooperation on health: an inclusive framework for cooperation would adhere to an all-encompassing regional, national, and global entity to ensure major health improvements in the ASEAN region. Therefore, in this complex setting, one system cannot solve the problem. There is a need for the involvement of all major actors such as state actors, private actors, civil-society organisations, healthcare professionals, healthcare workers, international development agencies, UN bodies, multilateral organisations and others. This will give momentum to the efforts towards advancing and sustaining universal health coverage. Integrated Health Information System – A Way to Equal Access to Healthcare: As ASEAN experiences demographic disparities, an integrated health system will be key to providing equal access to healthcare to different strata of society. For the benefit of everyone in this region, an integrated, reliable, and well-monitored National Health Information System needs to be put in place. This would monitor population movements and provide healthcare facilities by the health providers in various localities and residential areas. References 1 2020 Global Nutrition Report: Action on equity to end malnutrition. Retrieved from Bristol, UK: https://globalnutritionreport.org/reports/2020-global-nutrition-report/ 2 World Health Organization. (2021). The UNICEF/WHO/WB Joint Child Malnutrition Estimates (JME) group released new data for 2021. Retrieved fromhttps://www.who.int/news/item/06-05-2021-the-unicef-who-wb-joint-child-malnutrition-estimates-group-released-new-data-for-2021 3 World Health Organization. (2016). Framework on integrated, people-centred health services. Retrieved from https://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_files/WHA69/A69_39-en.pdf?ua=1&ua=1 4 World Health Organization. (2016). What is malnutrition? . Retrieved from https://www.who.int/features/qa/malnutrition/en/ 5 Swinburn, B. A., Kraak, V. I., Allender, S., Atkins, V. J., Baker, P. I., Bogard, J. R., . . . Dietz, W. H. (2019). The Global Syndemic of Obesity, Undernutrition, and Climate Change: The Lancet Commission report. Lancet (London, England), 393(10173), 791-846. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(18)32822-8 6 Popkin BM, Corvalan C, Grummer-Strawn LM. Dynamics of the double burden of malnutrition and the changing nutrition reality. Lancet. 2020 Jan 4;395(10217):65-74. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(19)32497-3. Epub 2019 Dec 15. PMID: 31852602; PMCID: PMC7179702. 7 Wells, J. C., Sawaya, A. L., Wibaek, R., Mwangome, M., Poullas, M. S., Yajnik, C. S., & Demaio, A. (2020). The double burden of malnutrition: aetiological pathways and consequences for health. Lancet (London, England), 395(10217), 75-88. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(19)32472-9 8 World Health Organization. (2017). Double-duty actions for nutrition: policy brief. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/WHO-NMH-NHD-17.2 9Association of Southeast Asian Nations. (2012). Declaration of the 5th ASEAN Health Ministers Meeting on Healthy ASEAN 2020 28-29 April 2000 Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Retrieved from https://asean.org/?static_post=declaration-of-the-5th-asean-health-ministers-meeting-on-healthy-asean-2020-28-29-april-2000-yogyakarta-indonesia 10World Health Organziation. (2018). UHC and SDG country Profile. Retrieved from https://iris.wpro.who.int/bitstream/handle/10665.1/14040/UHC-SDG-country-profiles-2018-eng.pdf 11 Arksey, H. and O'Malley, L. (2005) Scoping studies: towards a methodological framework, International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 8, 1, 19-32 12 Vusizihlobo, N., Mbuya.  , Sutayu, O., & Clarissa, D. (2019). Addressing the Double Burden of Malnutrition in ASEAN. Retrieved from Bangkok: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/33142 13 UNICEF/WHO/The World Bank Group. (2020). UNICEF/WHO/The World Bank Group joint child malnutrition estimates: levels and trends in child malnutrition: key findings of the 2020 edition. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/jme-2020-edition 14 Shrimpton, R., & Rokx, C. (2012). The double burden of malnutrition: a review of global evidence. Health, Nutrition and Population (HNP) discussion paper. . Retrieved from Washington, D.C.: https://documents.worldbank.org/en/publication/documents-reports/documentdetail/905651468339879888/the-double-burden-of-malnutrition-a-review-of-global-evidence 15 World Health Organization. (2013). Global action plan for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases 2013-2020. World Health Organization. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/9789241506236 16 Hawkes, C., Ruel, M. T., Salm, L., Sinclair, B., & Branca, F. (2020). Double-duty actions: seizing programme and policy opportunities to address malnutrition in all its forms. Lancet (London, England), 395(10218), 142-155. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(19)32506-1 17 World Health Organization. (2021). Universal health coverage (UHC). Retrieved from https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/universal-health-coverage-(uhc) 18 World Health Organization. (2019). Essential nutrition actions: mainstreaming nutrition through the life-course. Retrieved from Geneva: https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/9789241515856 19 World Health Organization. (2019). Nutrition in universal health coverage. Retrieved from Geneva: https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/329493/WHO-NMH-NHD-19.24-eng.pdf 20 World Health Organization. (2020). Mobilizing ambitious and impactful commitments for mainstreaming nutrition in health systems: nutrition in universal health coverage – global nutrition summit. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/9789240004252 World Health Organization. (n.d.-a). Constitution. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/about/who-we-are/constitution 21 World Health Organization. (2019b). Monitoring progress on universal health coverage and the health-related Sustainable Development Goals in the South-East Asia Region. Retrieved from https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/326828/9789290227205-eng.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

  • From plate to policy: an overview of the nutrition and health landscape in Brunei Darussalam

    Authors: Helena Trigueiro, Halima Jama, Haiza Ahmad, Sarah Dalzell, Sumantra Ray Reviewer and Editor: Ramya Rajaram Copyeditor: Veronica Funk Key Acknowledgements: Shailaja Fennel, Siti Rohaiza Binti Ahmad and Anne Cunningham; Support from the University of Cambridge, ASEAN Secretariat and Universiti Brunei Darussalam Special Acknowledgement for Funding in Part: Mary Lim (NNEdPro Southeast Asia) Brunei, like many nations, faces the challenge of meeting the nutritional needs of its population while navigating complex food systems. The nation presently heavily relies on imported food, necessitating the formulation of a comprehensive strategy. Aligned with this imperative is the government's Wawasan 2035 plan, which endeavours to not only diversify the economy but also to channel investments into the realms of agriculture and the agri-food sector. A judicious exploration of global research, notably delving into the scholarly contributions of Thompson and Scoones (2009), may furnish a nuanced roadmap for comprehending the intricate dynamics of Brunei's agri-food systems. Upon scrutinising available data, discerning patterns come to light, particularly in the realm of adolescent nutrition, which evoke a sense of concern. The prevalence of gender disparities, coupled with an absence of critical data pertaining to micronutrients, accentuates the imperative for precisely targeted interventions. The resolution of these challenges necessitates a thoughtfully nuanced approach, one that considers the multifaceted nature of the issues at hand. Figure 1 World Health Organization - Noncommunicable Diseases (NCD) Brunei Country Profiles, 2019. (World Health Organization 2019) Interventions encompass a spectrum of strategies aimed at addressing population health challenges. This includes low agency/nudge interventions, exemplified by initiatives like salt reduction programs, which reformulate foods to reduce salt intake or employ mass media campaigns to encourage behavioral changes. While these interventions may be perceived as limiting free choice, there exists potential synergy in combining approaches, especially in addressing complex issues such as childhood obesity (Adams, Mytton et al., 2016). In response to the prevalence of ultra-processed food and beverages, Adams, Hofman et al. (2020) emphasize the necessity of simultaneously altering supply and demand at all levels of the food system, alongside structural interventions to enhance access to convenient, palatable, and affordable minimally processed foods. Positioned as a wealthier nation within the ASEAN region, Brunei has the opportunity to pioneer the integration of these public health approaches, effectively combating the double burden of malnutrition it confronts. Another pivotal intervention involves enhancing nutrition education for healthcare practitioners. Despite doctors having limited influence over the diverse causes of diet-related diseases, an inadequately trained medical workforce is recognized as a structural contributor to diet-related diseases (Morris, 2014). Nutrition care, defined as health professionals' practices aimed at improving patients' nutritional behaviour and subsequent health (Ball et al., 2010), directly aligns with health care and population health systems (Willet et al., 2019). However, medical students and, subsequently, physicians are often trained to prioritize scientific evidence in pharmaceutical decision-making and clinical guidelines, overlooking the significance of nutritional interventions and guidelines in clinical nutrition (Womersley & Ripullone, 2017). In Brunei, where aspiring medical students first complete a Bachelor of Health Science Medicine (BHSc) degree at the University Brunei Darussalam before refining their clinical skills at partner universities globally (Rajam et al., 2021), the initial years of the BHSc program present a unique opportunity to enhance nutrition education for future physicians. This is especially relevant given their heightened exposure to their own cultural culinary habits. Moreover, by establishing academic partnerships with medical faculties worldwide, Brunei can adopt and showcase global models, positioning itself as a noteworthy example within the ASEAN region for teaching nutrition to medical students. Nutrition education for trained professionals is indispensable, warranting targeted interventions at both regional and national levels. In the broader context of public health, a systems framework is imperative for comprehending and addressing malnutrition. The three-tiered approach of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention requires a well-coordinated effort. Regular surveys, robust screening mechanisms, and a clear delineation of responsibilities for risk assessment and management are crucial components in this holistic endeavour. Vision for the Future The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) serve as a guiding beacon for integrated thinking and sustainability. Aligning Vision 2035 with environmental dimensions is crucial, especially concerning Brunei's goal to enhance food security and regional cooperation. Recognizing the untapped potential of Brunei's biodiversity can further this goal. Trends of rising obesity and unhealthy diets across the life-course are concerning. In particular, dietary habits of Brunei’s children and adolescents characterized by high intakes of SSBs, salty, fried snacks and low intakes of nutritious foods (e.g. fruits, vegetables, legumes, and nuts) are contributing to the nation’s current and future burden of malnutrition and NCDs. Knowledge and awareness are not sufficient to improve diets, as globalisation and the desire for convenient, fast food continues to promote obesogenic food environments and consumption of unhealthy diets.  The approaching demographic shift to an ageing population is also a reminder that the future costs of NCDs are likely to continue to rise. Emphasis on earlier prevention of malnutrition is essential. Requiring a better, more integrated understanding of socio-ecological determinants of food, nutrition and health, as well as the underpinning biological mechanisms that may increase risk in Brunei across all its varied contexts, ethnicities and age groups. If prioritised, developing food, health and social welfare systems that work together to identify and address nutrition inequities will ensure the realisation of Vision 2035 for all in Brunei Darussalam. Key Takeaways for a Healthy Future I. National Diet and Nutrition Surveillance for Comprehensive Risk Assessment and Progress Monitoring a. Implement a dynamic programme for ongoing assessment of dietary intakes and nutritional status. b. Ensure the regular availability of nationally representative estimates every three years to facilitate tracking. c. Enhance the utilisation of nutritional biomarkers for more thorough and nuanced assessments. II. Interdisciplinary Research for Evaluating Agri-food Systems and Food Environments a. Encourage interdisciplinary research spanning agriculture, nutrition, health, and social sciences. b. Update national dietary guidelines to incorporate considerations of ecological sustainability. III. Emphasis on Child and Adolescent Health: a. Integrate food and nutrition components into existing health initiatives targeted at adolescents. b. Conduct research to comprehend the factors driving obesity, particularly among boys. c. Introduce sustainability-focused food and health initiatives within schools and universities. IV. Monitoring and Evaluation: a. Designate clear responsibilities for the assessment and management of risks. b. Scrutinise policies through a double-duty action lens, addressing the challenges posed by the double burden of malnutrition. In conclusion, this article underscores the critical role of education, emphasising the need for nutrition-focused training for healthcare practitioners and medical students. By weaving together local cultural nuances and global best practices, Brunei has the potential to shape a healthcare landscape that goes beyond treating diseases to preventing malnutrition and fostering long-term well-being. Looking ahead, the vision extends beyond immediate interventions. 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Ministry of Health (Brunei Darussalam). (2020). "Downloads for campaigns, policies and other documents."   Retrieved 07/07/2020, from http://www.moh.gov.bn/SitePages/Downloads.aspx. National Academies of Sciences, E., and Medicine. (2019). Sustainable diets, food, and nutrition: Proceedings of a workshop. Washington, DC. Ong, S. K., S. Z. Kahan, D. T. C. Lai, K. A. Si-Ramlee, M. A. Abdullah, N. Sidup, Z. Kamis and C. L. Chong (2020). "Prevalence of undetected hypertension and its association with socio-demographic and non-communicable diseases risk factors in Brunei Darussalam." Journal of Public Health. Ong, S. K., D. T. C. Lai, J. Y. Y. Wong, K. A. Si-Ramlee, L. A. Razak, N. Kassim, Z. Kamis and D. Koh (2017). "Cross-sectional STEPwise Approach to Surveillance (STEPS) Population Survey of Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) and Risk Factors in Brunei Darussalam 2016." Asia-Pacific journal of public health 29(8): 635-648. Oxford Business Group. (2016). "Brunei Darussalam explores agro-industy and rice cultivation to help assure food security." The Report: Brunei Darussalam 2016 Retrieved 06/07/2020, from https://oxfordbusinessgroup.com/overview/seeds-growth-sultanate-exploring-diverse-means-assuring-food-security-including-agro-industry-and Padua, A. M., K. C. Lim and K. Pande (2015). "Use of bone mineral density assessment in Brunei Darussalam."  11: 303-309. Pg Suhaimi, A. M. A., H. Abdul Rahman, S. K. Ong and D. Koh (2020). "Predictors of non-communicable diseases screening behaviours among adult population in Brunei Darussalam: a retrospective study." Journal of Public Health. Prentice, A. (2004). "Diet, nutrition and the prevention of osteoporosis." Public Health Nutr 7(1A): 227-243. Shaarif, M. and S. R. Ahmad (2016). "Fruits and vegetables consumption among students studying at Universiti Brunei Darussalam." Brunei International Medical Journal 12. Siti Fatimahwati Pehin Dato, M., I. Pg Siti Rozaidah Pg Hj and B. Khairul Hidayatullah (2020). Exploring the Entrepreneurial Motivations and Barriers of Agripreneurs in Brunei Darussalam. Economics, Business, and Islamic Finance in ASEAN Economics Community. P. Patricia Ordoñez de, A. Mohammad Nabil and A. Muhamad. Hershey, PA, USA, IGI Global: 31-56. Swinburn, B. A., V. I. Kraak, S. Allender, V. J. Atkins, P. I. Baker, J. R. Bogard, H. Brinsden, A. Calvillo, O. De Schutter, R. Devarajan, M. Ezzati, S. Friel, S. Goenka, R. A. Hammond, G. Hastings, C. Hawkes, M. Herrero, P. S. Hovmand, M. Howden, L. M. Jaacks, A. B. Kapetanaki, M. Kasman, H. V. Kuhnlein, S. K. Kumanyika, B. Larijani, T. Lobstein, M. W. Long, V. K. R. Matsudo, S. D. H. Mills, G. Morgan, A. Morshed, P. M. Nece, A. Pan, D. W. Patterson, G. Sacks, M. Shekar, G. L. Simmons, W. Smit, A. Tootee, S. Vandevijvere, W. E. Waterlander, L. Wolfenden and W. H. Dietz (2019). "The Global Syndemic of Obesity, Undernutrition, and Climate Change: The Lancet Commission report." The Lancet. Thompson, J. and I. Scoones (2009). "Addressing the dynamics of agri-food systems: an emerging agenda for social science research." Environmental Science & Policy 12(4): 386-397. Van Bortel, T., N. D. Wickramasinghe, A. Morgan and S. Martin (2019). "Health assets in a global context: a systematic review of the literature." BMJ open 9(2): e023810-e023810. Ward, K. (2012). "Musculoskeletal phenotype through the life course: The role of nutrition." Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 71(1): 27-37. World Cancer Research Fund. (2020). "NOURISHING and MOVING policy databases,."   Retrieved 05/07/2020, from https://policydatabase.wcrf.org/nourishing-moving-search. World Health Organization. (2018). "Non-communicable Diseases (NCD) Country Profile: Brunei Darussalam."   Retrieved 07/05/2020, from https://www.who.int/nmh/countries/2018/brn_en.pdf?ua=1. WWF, W. W. F. F. N. (2020). "Heart of Borneo."   Retrieved 14/07/2020, from https://wwf.panda.org/knowledge_hub/where_we_work/borneo_forests/. Yakub, K. B. (2012). An ethnograhphic study of Wasan rice farm in Brunei Darussalam. . Masters, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University. Yun, T. C., S. R. Ahmad and D. K. S. Quee (2018). "Dietary Habits and Lifestyle Practices among University Students in Universiti Brunei Darussalam." The Malaysian journal of medical sciences : MJMS 25(3): 56-66. Morris NP. The neglect of nutrition in medical education: a firsthand look. JAMA internal medicine. 2014 Jun 1;174(6):841-2. Ball LE, Hughes RM, Leveritt MD. Nutrition in general practice: role and workforce preparation expectations of medical educators. Aust J Prim Health. 2010;16(4):304-10. doi: 10.1071/PY10014. PMID: 21138698. Willett W, Rockström J, Loken B, et al. Food in the Anthropocene: the EAT-Lancet Commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems [published correction appears in Lancet. 2019 Feb 9;393(10171):530] [published correction appears in Lancet. 2019 Jun 29;393(10191):2590] [published correction appears in Lancet. 2020 Feb 1;395(10221):338] [published correction appears in Lancet. 2020 Oct 3;396(10256):e56]. Lancet. 2019;393(10170):447-492. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31788-4 Womersley K, Ripullone K. Medical schools should be prioritising nutrition and lifestyle education. BMJ. 2017;359:j4861. Published 2017 Oct 26. doi:10.1136/bmj.j4861 Rajam DT, Idris FI, Kifli N, Abdul-Mumin KH, Hardaker G. Evolution of Undergraduate Medical Education in Brunei Darussalam. Brunei Int Med J.2021;17:55-60

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  • International Summit | NNEdPro

    Programme Registration The Venue Abstract WFF FAQ Supporters Democratising and Decolonising Food and Nutrition: From Science to Society PRE-SUMMIT WORKSHOP & ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION 1st July 2024 / 9:30 to 16:30 UK In-person & Virtual Ulster University City Campus, Belfast MAIN SUMMIT 17th to 20th December 2024 In-person & Virtual Science City, Kolkata, India Programme Registration The Venue Abstract WFF FAQ Supporters More... The NNEdPro Global Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health and the International Academy of Nutrition Educators are excited to announce the forthcoming "Democratising and Decolonising Food and Nutrition: From Science to Society " Summit. This Summit is dedicated to fostering a more inclusive, equitable, and collaborative approach to food and nutrition research, education, practice, and policy worldwide. At the heart of this Summit is the concept of enhancing global collaboration. 'Democratising' involves expanding the dialogue/conversation to include a diverse range of perspectives and viewpoints to bridge the gap between traditional knowledge systems and contemporary scientific research. We recognise the importance of integrating diverse viewpoints and expertise and are keen to establish a space where every voice is included, acknowledged and addressed. 'Decolonising' involves exploring the current food and nutrition landscape, acknowledging the historical influence of specific world regions and institutions on research directions, educational content, policy development, and clinical guidelines. Our objective is to foster an inclusive dialogue that respects and incorporates the contributions of all stakeholders, with a particular emphasis on those from historically underrepresented regions and communities. The Summit will highlight the significance of integrating traditional, indigenous and local food practices with global nutrition science by focusing on middle-income countries and their valuable insights. This approach aims to enrich our understanding and tackle disparities within the field. By utilising a case-based methodology and a constructive outlook, the Summit is set to identify critical areas for growth and collaboration across the four foundational pillars of research, education, practice, and policy. Through carefully examining existing studies and successful models, we aspire to uncover strategies that promote a more inclusive, equitable approach to food and nutrition. The Summit's ultimate vision is to pave the way for a future where the global food and nutrition community works hand in hand, leveraging diverse knowledge and perspectives. This collaborative effort seeks to ensure that our collective approach to food and nutrition is informed by a wide range of voices, driving forward with inclusivity and equity at the forefront, effectively bridging the gap between science and society. In line with the nine Summits preceding this event, all proceedings of our 10th Summit, including submitted and successful abstracts, will continue to be published in a peer-reviewed journal. Bringing together expert speakers from across 6 continents Plenary sessions and interactive panel with key opinion leaders on global systems perspective Scientific poster competition, workshops & networking opportunities Held in close partnership with the official NNEdPro journal: BMJ Nutrition, Prevention and Health As a delegate of the NNEdPro Summit you are entitled to a 20% discount on the cost of publishing an article in BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health Summit Programme The NNEdPro International Summit on Food, Nutrition and Health is a leading annual scientific meeting. The 2023 Summit considered ‘Sustainable Resourcing For All In Food & Nutrition Security: Creative solutions for healthy & resilient populations’, which highlighted the need to consider the inequities that exist within the food and nutrition landscape, leading us to fully explore the theme of ‘Democratising and Decolonising Food and Nutrition: From Science to Society ’ in 2024. This will take the form of a hybrid pre-summit workshop and roundtable discussion in Belfast, on 1st July 2024 , and a main Summit event, also in a hybrid format, in Kolkata, India, from 17th to 20th December. These events will bring together the collective views of our regional networks spanning over 65 countries as well as a multitude of organisations, giving even wider geographical and disciplinary coverage. ​ Registration inc ludes access to plenary sessions , interactive panel discussions and abstract presentations showcasing work from all N NEdPro Regional Networks and key collaborators, with 40+ hours of engaging content! The event will also be recorded. Click on the photos below to learn more about the chairs, theme leaders, and speakers for this year's Summit. Summit Co-Chairs Professor Pauline Douglas NNEdPro | Ulster University Professor Sumantra Ray NNEdPro Summit Theme Leaders Dr Ahlam El Shikieri NNEdPro | Taibah University Andre Laperriere Former Exec. Director GODAN Prof Clare Wall NNEdPro | University of Auckland Claudia Laricchia Smily Academy Jaroslav Guzanic NNEdPro | Swiss Association for Cooperation on Food Education Dr Kathy Martyn NNEdPro | Brighton University Nimo Muthike Busara Prof Nitya Rao University of East Anglia Saeeda Ahmed NNEdPro | Education Partnerships UK Dr Virginie Zoumenou University of Maryland Eastern Shore Dr Yenory Hernández-Garbanzo Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Local Theme Leaders Sudeshna Maitra Nag Peerless Hospital | Remedy Clinic Study Group Prof. Suprakash Pradhan Nurture Academy Welfare Trust | Prabhat Kumar College Summit Organisers Asim Manna Assistant Operations & Academic Officer Debashis Chakraborty Operations Officer Harmanpreet Kaur Operations & Academic Officer Jenneffer Braga Senior Academic Officer Sento Kai Kargbo Visiting Academic Associate Ramya Rajaram Academic Officer Roshni Kumar Visiting Academic Associate Sarah Anderson Senior Operations & Enterprise Officer Sarah Armes Senior Academic Officer Sucheta Mitra Deputy COO | Associate Director Wanja Nyaga Academic Officer Veronica Funk Petric Executive Assistant | Operations & Enterprise Assistant Matheus Abrantes Chief Operations & Enterprise Officer | Associate Director Summit Contributions from Regional Networks Leads from 10 Regional Networks will speak at the Summit events. Programme Registration Registration PRE-SUMMIT WORKSHOP & ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION 1st July 2024 / 9:30 to 16:30 UK. In-person & Virtual. Ulster University City Campus, Belfast. Register Here MAIN SUMMIT 17th to 20th December 2024. I n-person & Virtual. Science City, Kolkata, India. International Delegates Indian Delegates The Venue: Science City, Kolkata, India The main Summit event will be held from 17th to 20th December 2024 in the City of Kolkata, India. You can learn more about the venue here . Whilst we cannot advise on visa and other travel requirements, you can find useful links in the FAQ section . The Venue Abstract Abstracts Submission Our call for abstracts is now open! We are currently accepting abstracts that align with the theme of this year's Summit. Abstracts relevant to the themed BMJ NPH Special Collections can also be submitted. Accepted abstracts will have the opportunity to be published in the open-source journal BMJ Nutrition Prevention and Health . ​ ​ ​ ​ Abstract virtual presentation and competition T o deliver an engaging Summit experience for presenters and attendees, authors of accepted abstracts will be invited to submit a short video (3 to 5 minutes) presenting their work. Abstract presentations will also be entered into our Abstract Competition. ​ Key deadlines and dates Abstract submission deadline: tbc Abstract notification: tbc Video submission: tbc Registration deadline: tbc Summit event and announcement of abstract virtual competition winners: tbc Previous Abstracts 2024 Guidance World Food Forum Partnership We are thrilled to announce that the partnership between the NNEdPro Global Institute, our associate academy IANE, our esteemed journal, BMJ NPH , and the World Food Forum (WFF) hosted by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations (UN) will continue for the 2024 NNEdPro-IANE International Summit on Food, Nutrition and Health. ​ Following November 2023 the WFF global event in Rome, recipients of the WFF Transformative Research Challenge (TRC) awards were granted scholarships to join IANE. Additionally, the winning abstracts will be featured in the 2023 Summit Proceedings, which will be peer-reviewed and published in BMJ NPH. You can learn more about the event here . Professor Sumantra Ray, the NNEdPro Chair, is honoured to continue his role as a mentor for the WFF TRC for a fourth year. WFF FAQ Frequently Asked Questions What are the Terms & Conditions to attend the course? 1. The NNEdPro Summer School is for individuals interested in nutrition and its health applications and is also open to undergraduate students as well as adult learners. Whilst the course is open-access, a background in relevant biological sciences and/or health related disciplines is required for candidates to sit the final assessment and to receive a certificate of competence. However, those from other backgrounds will be eligible for a certificate of attendance but will not need to sit the final assessment. 2. To ensure that all participants are able to enjoy as well as benefit from studying with us, you will need to be confident understanding and following arguments presented in written and spoken English at University level. 3. Refunds can only be issued for cancellation requests received up to seven days after the access to the material is given, this will be when the email confirmation with your access details to the NNEdPro Virtual Learning Environment is sent. If you cancel after that, no refunds can be issued. Substitute delegates are not accepted. Please note that any transaction fee incurred will be deducted from your refund.To request a refund, please contact us at info@nnedpro.org.uk Who is the course for? The Summer School is intended for individuals interested in nutrition and its health-applications and is also open to undergraduate students and other adult learners. How much time should I set aside for this course? The course consists of: Around 40 hours of pre-recorded lectures you can study at your own pace. You will be invited for a 2-day Q&A and mentoring session with the faculty online or in person in Cambridge, according to your selection when booking the course. The assignments (essay, critical appraisal and final test) should not take longer than 3 hours each to complete. What are the requirements? Whilst the course is open-access, a background in relevant biological sciences and/or health related disciplines is required for candidates to sit the final assessment and to receive a certificate of competence. However, those from other backgrounds will be eligible for a certificate of attendance but will not need to sit the final assessment. To ensure that all participants are able to enjoy as well as benefit from studying with us, you will need to be confident understanding and following arguments presented in written and spoken English at University level. Can I upgrade to the in person mentoring? Yes. If you register for the fully online version but decide to subsequently attend in-person mentoring in Cambridge, please email learning@nnedpro.org.uk to pay the difference in fees. Cambridge University College Dinner For those attending in-person mentoring in Cambridge, there is an optional College Dinner on the first evening, and this will be payable separately. What will I learn throughout the course? The course provides in depth exposure to Applied Human Nutrition including basic concepts in human nutrition; nutritional research methods; nutrition in healthcare and nutrition public health and policy. For a taste of what to expect, check out the previous years content at the bottom of the page. Will I be assessed? Candidates from healthcare and related backgrounds will be able to undertake an assessment at the end of the course to gain a certificate of competence, accredited by professional bodies in the UK for the purposes of Continuing Professional Development. To date, dual accreditation has been provided by the Royal College of Physicians and the Royal Society of Biology in the UK, providing internationally recognised quality benchmarks. If are not from healthcare and related backgrounds, you can still complete the final assignment to receive a certificate of completion. What additional support and benefits can I get? In addition to learn and network with an international community of peers and experts, the opportunity to be assessed and gain a certificate of competence, as a member of the International Academy of Nutrition Education (IANE) Members you will receive a post-course 1:1 mentoring session. As a delegate of a NNEdPro event, you are also entitled to a 20% discount on the cost of publishing your article in BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health. Those attending the NNEdPro Summer School will receive discounted registration to the NNEdPro International Summit on Food, Nutrition and Health. This scientific meeting is a opportunity for candidates attending the NNEdPro Summer School to participate in directly relevant international conference proceedings immediately after completing their course. Is there a discount for group reservations? A discount of 10%, 12% and 15% will be applied for groups of over 3, 6 and 10 respectively. Please contact us to learn more. What is your refund policy? 3. Refunds can only be issued for cancellation requests received up to seven days after the access to the material is given, this will be when the email confirmation with your access details to the NNEdPro Virtual Learning Environment is sent. If you cancel after that, no refunds can be issued. Substitute delegates are not accepted. Please note that any transaction fee incurred will be deducted from your refund. To request a refund, please contact us at info@nnedpro.org.uk Any more questions? Please contact us at info@nnedpro.org.uk or use the enquire button available on this page Supporters Add your organisation's logo here. Download our Supporters Package to learn more. Supporters Previous Years 2023 Read More > 2022 Read More > 2021 Read More > 2020 Read More > 2019 Read More > 2018 Read More > 2017 Read More > 2016 Read More > 2015 Read More > In partnership with Event organised by

  • NNEdPro Global Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health

    Founded in Cambridge (UK) in 2008 and directed by Professor Sumantra (Shumone) Ray , the NNEdPro Global Institute along with its partner initiatives seeks to advance and implement food and nutrition knowledge for health and society. At least one in nine people will go hungry today, yet 2.6 billion are overweight or obese globally. Countless individuals also experience ‘hidden hunger’ due to a lack of micronutrients. For many, a nutritious diet is simply unavailable or unaffordable. We believe that everyone has the right to access healthy food and that global malnutrition can be resolved through equity, collaboration, knowledge sharing and technology. Led by cutting-edge academic research, we look to benefit vulnerable families and communities on-the-ground, as our education programmes train frontline healthcare and nutrition professionals throughout the world. Together, through interdisciplinary partnerships, we can improve food and health systems – from production through to consumption, and beyond into healthcare – to change behaviours and facilitate sustainable improvements in global nutrition. let's end malnutrition by 2030 Democratising and Decolonising Food and Nutrition: From Science to Society PRE-SUMMIT WORKSHOP & ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION 1st July 2024 / 9:30 to 16:30 UK In-person & Virtual Ulster University City Campus, Belfast MAIN SUMMIT 17th to 20th December 2024 In-person & Virtual Science City, Kolkata, India Learn more What are the Terms & Conditions to attend the course? 1. The NNEdPro Summer School is for individuals interested in nutrition and its health applications and is also open to undergraduate students as well as adult learners. Whilst the course is open-access, a background in relevant biological sciences and/or health related disciplines is required for candidates to sit the final assessment and to receive a certificate of competence. However, those from other backgrounds will be eligible for a certificate of attendance but will not need to sit the final assessment. 2. To ensure that all participants are able to enjoy as well as benefit from studying with us, you will need to be confident understanding and following arguments presented in written and spoken English at University level. 3. Refunds can only be issued for cancellation requests received up to seven days after the access to the material is given, this will be when the email confirmation with your access details to the NNEdPro Virtual Learning Environment is sent. If you cancel after that, no refunds can be issued. Substitute delegates are not accepted. Please note that any transaction fee incurred will be deducted from your refund.To request a refund, please contact us at info@nnedpro.org.uk Who is the course for? The Summer School is intended for individuals interested in nutrition and its health-applications and is also open to undergraduate students and other adult learners. How much time should I set aside for this course? The course consists of: Around 40 hours of pre-recorded lectures you can study at your own pace. You will be invited for a 2-day Q&A and mentoring session with the faculty online or in person in Cambridge, according to your selection when booking the course. The assignments (essay, critical appraisal and final test) should not take longer than 3 hours each to complete. What are the requirements? Whilst the course is open-access, a background in relevant biological sciences and/or health related disciplines is required for candidates to sit the final assessment and to receive a certificate of competence. However, those from other backgrounds will be eligible for a certificate of attendance but will not need to sit the final assessment. To ensure that all participants are able to enjoy as well as benefit from studying with us, you will need to be confident understanding and following arguments presented in written and spoken English at University level. Can I upgrade to the in person mentoring? Yes. If you register for the fully online version but decide to subsequently attend in-person mentoring in Cambridge, please email learning@nnedpro.org.uk to pay the difference in fees. Cambridge University College Dinner For those attending in-person mentoring in Cambridge, there is an optional College Dinner on the first evening, and this will be payable separately. What will I learn throughout the course? The course provides in depth exposure to Applied Human Nutrition including basic concepts in human nutrition; nutritional research methods; nutrition in healthcare and nutrition public health and policy. For a taste of what to expect, check out the previous years content at the bottom of the page. Will I be assessed? Candidates from healthcare and related backgrounds will be able to undertake an assessment at the end of the course to gain a certificate of competence, accredited by professional bodies in the UK for the purposes of Continuing Professional Development. To date, dual accreditation has been provided by the Royal College of Physicians and the Royal Society of Biology in the UK, providing internationally recognised quality benchmarks. If are not from healthcare and related backgrounds, you can still complete the final assignment to receive a certificate of completion. What additional support and benefits can I get? In addition to learn and network with an international community of peers and experts, the opportunity to be assessed and gain a certificate of competence, as a member of the International Academy of Nutrition Education (IANE) Members you will receive a post-course 1:1 mentoring session. As a delegate of a NNEdPro event, you are also entitled to a 20% discount on the cost of publishing your article in BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health. Those attending the NNEdPro Summer School will receive discounted registration to the NNEdPro International Summit on Food, Nutrition and Health. This scientific meeting is a opportunity for candidates attending the NNEdPro Summer School to participate in directly relevant international conference proceedings immediately after completing their course. Is there a discount for group reservations? A discount of 10%, 12% and 15% will be applied for groups of over 3, 6 and 10 respectively. Please contact us to learn more. What is your refund policy? 3. Refunds can only be issued for cancellation requests received up to seven days after the access to the material is given, this will be when the email confirmation with your access details to the NNEdPro Virtual Learning Environment is sent. If you cancel after that, no refunds can be issued. Substitute delegates are not accepted. Please note that any transaction fee incurred will be deducted from your refund. To request a refund, please contact us at info@nnedpro.org.uk Any more questions? Please contact us at info@nnedpro.org.uk or use the enquire button available on this page 1/6 PLEASE SUPPORT US Please support us today so we can continue to advance and implement food and nutrition knowledge for health and society this year and beyond to help achieve significant progress toward the 2025 goals of the United Nations Decade of Action on Nutrition. By supporting us, you will facilitate the continuity of the NNEdPro projects and initiatives. DONATE NOW LEARN MORE NNEdpro in the news Latest CONTENT Unveiling MTK Cookbook 2.0 – Redefining Healthy Eating Author – Ramya Rajaram Contributor – Harmanpreet Kaur Editing – Veronica Funk, Matheus Abrantes, Sumantra Ray Join us on the next step in... 153 5 likes. Post not marked as liked 5 Malnutrition Policy to Achieve Universal Health Coverage in ASEAN Member States: A Call to Action Authors: Helena Trigueiro, Jørgen Torgerstuen Johnsen, Sucheta Mitra, Halima Jama, Mei Yen Chan and Sumantra Ray Reviewer and Editor:... 64 4 likes. Post not marked as liked 4 From plate to policy: an overview of the nutrition and health landscape in Brunei Darussalam Authors: Helena Trigueiro, Halima Jama, Haiza Ahmad, Sarah Dalzell, Sumantra Ray Reviewer and Editor: Ramya Rajaram Copyeditor: Veronica... 52 4 likes. Post not marked as liked 4 read more Partner initiatives founded by the NNEdPro Global Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health Global Nutrition [Health & Disease]

  • Governors and Advisors | NNEdPro

    Anchor 1 advisory & Steering Committees Finance, Audit and Risk Committee Governance & Finance Committee EDI Committee Education Committees Within the NNEdPro Board of Directors , those registered as Persons with Significant Control (PSCs) with UK Companies House comprise the Governance and Finance Committee (GFC), which reports to the Finance, Audit and Risk Committee (FinARC). Additionally, the Strategic Advisory Committee (SAC) provides independent advice to PSCs and Directors. An annual strategy day is convened each year bringing together the Directors, FinARC and SAC. The GFC is also responsible for convening scientific and ethical review panels relating to projects and initiatives which require independent peer review. The GFC oversees the Projects, Operations and Strategy Team (POST), under which there are committees with delegated responsibility for Education, Events and EDI. Events Committees Strategic Advisory Committee Andy Burman Former Chief Executive of the BDA & FinARC Chair Prof John O'Brien Director at the Food Observatory Prof Suzanne Piscopo Professor at University of Malta Finance, Audit & Risk COmmittee (Finarc) members Navigation Presidential Officers Board of Directors Operations Volunteers Interns International Virtual Core International Collaborators Regional Networks Academy (IANE) Network Ambassadors Network Alumni Network Interdisciplinary Project Teams Advisory & Steering Committees Global Innovation Panel Research Leadership Panel Members Index Anchor 2 Governance & finance COmmittee (gfc) Matheus Abrantes Prof Pauline Douglas GFC Chair Prof Sumantra Ray Anchor 3 Strategic Advisory Committee (SAC) Dr Anant Jani Oxford Martin Fellow at the Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford Annemieke van Ginkel-Res Honorary President of The European Federation of the Associations of Dietitians (EFAD) Dr Colette Shortt Independent Advisor Dr Jeff Bohn University of California, Berkley Kate Guberg UK Research and Innovation Dr Maria Traka Deputy Head of Food Databanks National Capability, Quadram Institute Nimo Muthike Engagement Director, Busara Pauline Mulholland People and Partnership Rose Hastreiter Founder, L3C Learning & Leadership Selvarani Elahi Deputy Government Chemist, LGC Group Dr Vipan Bhardwaj National Board Member, Modality Partnership

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